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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  katejohnson 3 months ago.

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  • #175811

    exponentdizziness
    Participant

    I take one “Cod liver oil and multivitamins” capsule every day. We were told they have been replaced by “A-Z complete 50+ vitamins and minerals.”
    Apart from containing ten additional chemicals the packet says diabetics should consult their doctor before taking them.
    The chemicals are calcium, magnesium,iron, zinc, manganese, selenium, chromium,molybdenum, iodine,lutein. Six of these are 100 per cent of Nutrient Reference Value, whatever that is. The A-Z complete 50+ stuff is completely absent from the Boots website.
    Before I waste my time asking my GP can anyone here throw some light on this please.
    Thank you

    #176017

    precedecoiltie
    Participant

    Don’t think GPs would have a clue to be honest…. They certainly only know the eat well plate the NHS advise and would not be able to advise unless you had deficiencies showing with Iron or B12 or D3.

    Have you analysed your own diet usung myfitnesspal or adding up your own dietary food to see if you need mutli vitamins?

    I take over 50’s multi vitamin, D3 (despite being outdoors so much) garlic tablet, omega 3 suplements on days when I do not have oily fish or salads. I also take magnesium separately and plant sterols. I am 52.

    I also eat only natural, healthy food..no processed foods except milk or butter or feta cheese.

    My GPs wouldn’t know healthy eating or vitamins if they come up and bit them on their bum’s..so I have to analyse my own health.

    GP’s are only Generally Practicing Medicine… We, the patients are their guinea pigs as far as I’m concerned…

    #176018

    dipperbloating
    Participant

    Hi. I agree most GPs wouldn’t have a clue or would give you their (invalid?) personal opinion and as for dieticians…. Since being diagnosed I have seen endless notices in public areas warning you if you are a diabetic to avoid whatever. Generally these are stupid and assume you have very poor blood sugar control. I know of no reason why a diabetic with reasonable control shouldn’t have the same vitamin supplements as anyone else. We are not ill but have a specific ‘condition’.

    #176019

    precedecoiltie
    Participant

    If you want to take this product, I guess I don’t see any great harm… they have probably put that bit about diabetics on there because someone once had a problem with it and they don’t want to be sued.

    I haven’t seen any robust scientific evidence that anyone needs to take multivitamins, and the scientific evidence suggests that for the most part, only people with certain medical reasons or a deficiency that shows up in blood testing need to take a vitamin or mineral supplement. (If anyone would like to challenge this view, I would be more convinced by peer reviewed journal articles than websites with people’s opinions about supplements.)

    Some of these vitamins and minerals are dangerous in large amounts.

    These are the sorts of things that doctors know about vitamins and minerals, and this is why it is a good idea to discuss with your doctor all the products you take, whether they are prescription drugs, over the counter drugs, herbal supplements, vitamins, minerals, or other supplements. Some conditions that can be made worse by taking non-drug products, and these products can also interact with drugs and cause problems.

    #177813

    katejohnson
    Participant

    Vitamin E acts as a powerful antioxidant by neutralizing free radicals in the body that cause tissue and cellular damage. Vitamin E also contributes to a healthy circulatory system and aids in proper blood clotting and improves wound healing. Some studies have shown that vitamin E decreases symptoms of premenstrual syndrome and certain types of breast disease.
    Other studies have shown that taking large doses of Vitamin E has decreased the risk of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Animal studies have suggested that vitamin E does slow the development of atherosclerosis, but the American Heart Association doesn’t recommend using supplements until the effects are proven in large-scale, carefully controlled clinical trials Primary care in Chelsea.

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